Managing Windows 8.1 and the MS Surface in the Enterprise – Part 1: Who’s Minding the Store?

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Love it or hate it, but Windows 8.1 was intended to be both a desktop and “device” operating system. There have been many articles written about how well it succeeds or fails at one or both of those objectives. Regardless of how you feel about Windows 8.1, if you are tasked with managing it in you enterprise, you don’t need another rant / rave post. You need some guidance on how to manage some of the intricacies that Windows 8.1 and some device form factors like the Surface bring into play. That’s what this series of posts aims to do.

I’ve been selected to deliver a session next month as part of the Microsoft MVP Virtual Conference – You can register here. My session is focussed on the managing the MS Surface in the Enterprise and as part of my preparation I’ve been assembling lots of nuggets that will be scattered throughout the presentation. This blog post series is an attempt to aggregate some of the more significant pieces from the session that may have broader appeal.

As part of Microsoft’s attempt to create an OS that is appealing to tablet device users, Microsoft introduced the Windows Store. The Windows Store is Microsoft’s version of Google Play, Apples iTunes App Store, the Amazon Appstore for Android and many other sources for device based apps. The current incarnation of the Windows Store showcases Modern UI (formerly known as Metro) applications.

Like the other AppStores, the Windows store is designed for consumers to purchase applications to run on their devices. Unlike the other AppStores, the Windows Store model needs to coexist with legacy software delivery methods in use by enterprise IT departments such as SCCM.  While inconvenient, this is not a knock against the Windows Store.  Other platforms don’t have this issue because they don’t have any legacy applications or enterprise software delivery models.

What can we do Today?

For now there are really two methods for managing Modern Apps in an enterprise setting:

1. Sideload the application

  • Requires Certificate to sign the app since it will bypass the store validation
  • Requires .Appx Bundle from the application developer / vendor
  • Applications can be inserted into image with DISM
  • Applications can be distributed with System Center Configuration Manager

2. Deep Link the application

  • Requires Windows Store account for each user (does not need to be linked to domain account)
  • Associates application with user
  • Applications cannot be included in image
  • Still requires some user input (not truly silent)

Access to the Windows store can be controlled through group policy.

If you choose to permit users to access the store there is still the ability to restrict or allow specific applications with AppLocker.

Coming with Windows 10

Microsoft has announced that this will get easier with Windows 10. Organizations will be able to setup a private “boutique” within the Windows Store and curate which applications their users will be able to browse and install. Organizations will also be able to use a single store account to make volume purchases and download the installation files and distribute them in ways that make sense for their use cases (machines without internet access, reassigning applications, etc.).

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One thought on “Managing Windows 8.1 and the MS Surface in the Enterprise – Part 1: Who’s Minding the Store?

    […] I’ve been selected to deliver a session next month as part of the Microsoft MVP Virtual Conference – You can register here. My session is focussed on the managing the MS Surface in the Enterprise and as part of my preparation I’ve been assembling lots of nuggets that will be scattered throughout the presentation. This blog post series is an attempt to aggregate some of the more significant pieces from the session that may have broader appeal.  This is the second installment in the series.  Here is a link to part 1 – Who’s Minding the Windows Store. […]

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